Western Countries coming out of crime epidemic

Levels of common crime including thefts, burglaries, robberies and assaults have fallen significantly over the last 10 years in nearly all industrialised countries, after steep increases in the period before.
That is one of the key findings of the recently published report Criminal Victimisation in International Perspective. The book reports on a victim survey amongst the general public in over 30 countries, conducted in 2004/2005 in collaboration with the United Nations.
On average, an estimated 16% of the population in the 30 nations participating in country level surveys have been a victim of at least one of any of ten common crimes in the course of one year (mainly 2003 or 2004). Levels of common crime were …

Read More » Comments Off

Life begins at 40 and 50 and 60

Growing old is a happier experience than many of us imagine – that’s according to the findings of a study conducted at Queen’s University, Belfast, on behalf of the Changing Ageing Partnership (CAP).
The study, which was conducted by Dr John Garry from Queen’s University, looked at young people’s attitudes to happiness in old age and how these attitudes affect their current health-related behaviour.
Dr Garry said: “We have all heard the saying ‘life begins at forty’. But it seems that many people, particularly young people, actually associate growing old with being miserable, meaning they don’t see any benefit in preserving their health for old age.
“Young people like to enjoy themselves, but this often means behaving in …

Read More » Comments Off

How proud are young people of national history?

Native youth and those of immigrant background find country of residence important
Despite their various backgrounds, cultures and religions Western European youth think the country in which they live is important. Especially native young people feel a connection with history, and boys more so than girls.
This has emerged from the WRR study Nationale Identiteit en meervoudig verleden (National identity and multiple pasts) from professor Maria Grever and Dr Kees Ribbens of the Erasmus University Rotterdam. Grever and Ribbens asked more than 650 students aged 14 to 18 in Rotterdam, London and Lille to what extent they identify with the country in which they live. What role does national history play in this? The study is published …

Read More » Comments Off

Software Development Technology – Higher Education

The need for educated individuals to work on developing computer software for a variety of reasons is growing as technology grows. In order to fully be capable of working in this industry students must earn a higher education in software development technology. Technology and computer based schools offer degree programs for interested students. There are a number of things one should know prior to enrolling.
1) The opportunities in higher education are specifically designed to generate well-rounded students that can contribute to computer software development. Computer software is related to everything from multimedia interfaces and design procedures to operating systems. Higher education offers students the chance to enter a degree program in software development technology or …

Read More » Comments Off

Understanding the wow factor

What links a neuroscientist with a social anthropologist and the UK’s premier independent art charity?The answer is the visual perception of art. When, why and how are individuals moved by a piece of art in a museum or gallery?
These are the questions to be examined between the world renowned Department of Museum Studies and the Department of Engineering at the University of Leicester, in collaboration with The Art Fund.
Social anthropologist Dr Sandra Dudley, and Professor of Bioengineering Rodrigo Quian Quiroga are each facing what they admit is one of the biggest research challenges of their careers.
Working with the Director of The Art Fund, Mr David Barrie, in the supervision of a new PhD student dedicated …

Read More » Comments Off

Work-Life Balance Blurred for Some Employees

Employees with high levels of job autonomy and control over their schedules are more likely to bring their work home with them, according to surprising new research out of the University of Toronto.
Using data from a 2002 nationally representative survey of more than 2,600 American workers, sociology professor Scott Schieman and Ph.D. student Paul Glavin examined the impacts of schedule control and job autonomy on work-family role blurring. Role blurring is measured by how often employees bring work home and how often they receive work-related contact outside of normal working hours.
The study found the following:
• Having great schedule control – that is, having greater control over the start and finish times of work – is …

Read More » Comments Off
 Page 1 of 13  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »